The Role of SEO in Web Development With JavaScript

With the ever growing and evolving nature of the internet and the different websites you find online, it is expected to come across with a number of mixed messages along the way. One of the longest debated topics when it comes to the role of search engine optimization in web development is whether or not using JavaScript is a great idea when optimizing a website for search engines.

The online crowd is divided – some people firmly believe that Java should not be used at all, while others think that using JavaScript is essential and contributes a lot to the overall success of a website. If you are one of the many who is considering whether to use JavaScript on your website or not, this article will help you clear your head and let you see both the good side and the bad side of using Java and how it relates to search engine marketing.

One of the main reasons why a lot of website developers and web designers are big on JavaScript is its being simple and providing a lot of options for the website owner – Java is a relatively simple programming language that will let you create several web effects that is impossible for traditional HTML to do. On top of that, using Java in a website also provides a great solution to the common problem of code bloat.

Code bloat is a situation where the size of an HTML file used for a certain web page reaches its threshold, usually the limits set by the different search engines. When your website or even just a single web page on your website goes beyond the specified limits of codes, you will be penalized with a lower ranking in the results pages which is not good news.

On the other side of the fence however, a lot of web developers also think that applying Java will only harm your rankings simply because it makes it harder for the search engine web spiders to crawl on your website for indexing. Search engine crawlers already have a lot of ground to cover these days and crawling through overwhelming volumes of JavaScript codes makes it very hard for them to find what they are looking for.

Search engine crawlers look for keywords and relevant text and information in your website before it gets indexed and ranked, and if you have lots of JavaScript embedded within your website the crawlers will have a hard time figuring out if your website is relevant or not, thus harming your SEO strategy.

All things considered, using Java will not make or break your SEO strategy. As long as you have your online marketing strategy all planned out, you will not have a hard time deciding whether to use JavaScript or not.

Web Development in a Fair Way

The story

When a young man starts his LIFE alone he always have great intentions about something he already interested in be it sports, literature or technology. He always has great dreams about the future, that he will be famous in some ways, will do something nobody has ever done before and will go further then anybody in the past. He will build and then lead his business to great success, will find somebody to love, will raise a family and will lead a happy life. But as time goes by he finds it harder and harder to push through…

The business

Web development. Small or big, simple or complex, everything from one page to enterprise-level database management applications. Dealing with special needs the same way as with general queries. Working over 60 hours a week delivering only the highest quality in every job without compromise. Advanced level skills in several programming languages make it easy to select and use the right tools for every project. Having the experience to bring a project from scratch to completion. Only clean hand-written code, bespoke content management systems, unique designs, cross-browser compatibility, logical structure, extendability and interactivity – in one word, professionalism what describes the products.

Sharks in the water

Running a business always involve competitors. Old ones, new ones, smaller ones, bigger ones, less or more but there are always some. And it is all right. All right, as long as it is fair. However in the web development business nothing seems to be fair at the moment.

Customers are not aware of differences between a website and a website. They can see, what is on the screen. They can see if they can find themselves on Google. And they can see the prices. And one’s price is a really small fragment of the other. The difference is so huge that the customer thinks nobody would do it so cheap so just out of curiosity they start communicating with the guy offering the cheap price. After a few conversations it is obvious that they are talking about the same thing. It makes the customer believe that the other quote is the one which is incorrect. And there cannot be that much difference between the two products. And of course that is true.

Probably there is a little difference. Probably there is none. And even if the product is completely the same in terms of hours spent on the project, structured clean code, good results in search engines, quality design, cross-browser compatibility, high accessibility and so on, there is just a LITTLE thing… And it is called FAIRNESS.

A website can be built on a computer and can be uploaded from anywhere in the world where there is an internet connection. There are many great developers and many great designers all around the world where the cost of living is really just a small chunk comparing to the cost of living in the UK, especially around London…

So Website Owners! While you don’t call yourself a millionaire however you would be really wealthy with your monthly income in some other countries, PLEASE don’t consider your country’s prices way too high just because you are having your site done by someone from far away! Thank you.

The start

When the young man started his life finishing school with a broken-up family behind his back he still had the dream to live for. In fact, that was all he had. Everyday survival can take the focus off easily though. And it did. Forgetting your dream however does not mean that you have to lose it…

Bouncing between jobs, between pride and prejudice turned his life upside down every now and then. Everywhere he went there was somebody to tell him he is going the wrong way. Time after time somebody told him to forget his dreams and grow up. He hated them. He wished they had not been there.

Although he hated them he sometimes felt they might be right. Sometimes he felt he should gave up, like everybody seemed to had given up already around him and join the queue at the end. It seemed to be all right. It seemed to be so easy. Everybody did the same. Everybody joined the same queue. He seemed to be sticking out more and more by every day and it did not feel good. But there was something he could not get out of his mind…

“A fruit is either ripening or rotting. There is no stationary state in between.”

Those people had given up already. There was nothing in front of them. They had cut all their chances that something might change to any better. The young man suddenly had to realize that those people were the only ones who helped keeping his dream alive showing great contrast between future and survival. And he has chosen the future…

Humor of faith

The young man ended up in the United Kingdom. He came to find some answers for the questions bothering him. He wanted to stay a couple of years trying his luck and wanted to save some money. But this move gave him much more than he ever expected. Learning the language and getting familiar with British culture opened his eyes a bit wider and he has seen his dream once again. Below the surface it has grown even bigger through those years than it has been ever before. And it seems to be closing up on him now…

Become a Web Developer Overnight – Well, Not Really

Since working in the technology industry, I’ve had many people tell me that they would like to get paid to develop websites. They’ve asked me numerous questions like: How do I start? Where do you find work? How much should I charge? and so on.

The truth is, there is work out there and ALOT of it. But the work that is readily available really depends on your experience.

When I first started, I was just out of college, with a handful of personal websites I had developed through a Multimedia Journalism class taught by Cindy Royal. And honestly, I wasn’t the best student or the most talented. I was married with a new baby, who breastfed while I worked on my homework. Who has the time or energy to develop award-winning websites with a baby attached to them? And since I didn’t have any real-life experience working with clients, I scrounged up some mom-and-pop type websites for really cheap. And I mean REALLY cheap. I got these jobs from my friends and relatives.

It was when I got a full-time job in the non-profit sector of the technology industry with salary and benefits I honed my skills and learned how the industry operates. When I had down time, I would train on Lynda.com. Which I highly suggest for less than $400/year you get training that would otherwise cost thousands. And lucky for me, my boss loved to send me to training seminars, and said “yes” when I suggested that I go to Photoshop World in Boston and “yes” again when I went to it in Las Vegas, sent me to SXSW every year, Knowbility’s AccessU and a plethora of others. I didn’t make much money at that first job, but the “perks” made it well worth it.

After that job (and my second child), I freelanced for a little bit, but I was antsy to get back into the workforce and see what the for-profit sector held for me. So when I got a job at an advertising and interactive agency with competitive pay, I was psyched.

Compared to my first job where my skill set grew by leaps and bounds and I exercised it at my leisure, this second job was where I put it all into practice. I was constantly under deadline for big name, big money clients. I learned fast that it is all about the client, the money and “getting it right the first time.” A huge adjustment after my “for the good of the people” job.

In fact, the first day my supervisor asked me how it was going, I said, “I didn’t realized I would be already working on a project,” considering I was still setting up my computer and getting passwords for my system. He told me, “Sink or swim!” If I had jumped into the waters of this second job before experiencing the first one, I definitely would have sunk.

That job catapulted me into becoming a true professional. I worked long hard hours. “This is not an 8-hour-a-day job,” I was told regularly. Eventually, the late nights and constant stress got to this mother-of-two (not to mention wife, cleaning crew, and all-around super-woman-extraordinaire). More tired then fearful of whether I would have enough work or not, I went back to full-time freelancing and I haven’t looked back yet.

Knowing people in the industry, has been a key factor in getting jobs. But there are a couple other tips that I can offer those first starting out.

1. Offer referral incentives to your clients, if they send you someone who signs a contract, they get 1-year of free hosting or something like that.

2. Start with the people you know, have business cards ready to hand out.

3. Go to seminars in the industry (Photoshop World, Flash Forward, SXSW, etc) – get to know people via networking to find out how they get clients.

4. Find a niche market and get to know the people in that market. (Ideas for markets listed below)

5. Avoid people who want something for nothing like the plague, try to work with people who know that starting a website will actually cost money.

6. Apply SEO to your own website. Advertise for yourself. Write articles for the industry, you never know when they will be picked up and linked to, which will increase your web ranking.

7. Subcontract with former employers.

8. Subcontract with agencies.

9. Always keep learning. The more you know…the more you know…and the more you are worth to a client.

10. Get to know other web developers and try to get a semiotic relationship going where you can hand clients off to each other.

Niche Market Suggestions

1. Wedding Industry
2. Restaurants and Nightclubs
3. Maintenance (Lawn Care/Plumbers/Auto Care)
4. Government/Non-Profit
5. Music (accomplished musicians, not just rock bands looking to make it big because they usually don’t have money anyway)
6. Children (Boutiques/Daycares)
7. Medical (Hipaa Rules Apply)
8. Home Builders/Construction
9. Lawyers
10. Death – a little morbid but as my favorite personal business finding motto goes “Birth and Death – neither are avoidable nor stopped by recession” (Funeral Parlors, Casket Makers, etc)